Case

The metro goes west

The West Metro contract, which began five years ago in the Helsinki metropolitan area, proceeded in giant leaps during 2014. Lemminkäinen continued work on the Tapiola and Matinkylä metro station contracts that started in 2013 and will be completed by the end of 2015.

Case

Aino residential complex – record-breaking construction time

Aino residential estate is located in the centre of Saint Petersburg, in a historical district – on Vasiliyevsky Island. A thirteen-storey building comprises six sections connected between each other. The Aino residential estate was built in two phases and was completed in 2013 and 2014.

Case

Rantaväylä tunnel will remove a bottleneck

In 2014, cars are still queueing at traffic lights on Rantaväylä road in Tampere, in central Finland, during the evening rush hour, but soon the situation will become better. The construction of the Rantaväylä tunnel will improve the flow and safety of traffic and contribute to the development of Tampere city centre.

Case

Meeting high-quality requirements in airport paving in western Norway

Our completion in June 2014 of the paving of one of the two runways at Stavanger Airport Sola is the latest in a string of recent airport projects of us in Finland and Norway. The work was completed in just nine days, and met the highest quality requirements.

Case

One sea – many scenes

We are building new homes and commercial premises in various parts of Helsinki. The projects offer solutions for many different needs and their location varies from peaceful natural surroundings to lively city centre areas. Most of these projects have one thing in common: the sea.

Case

Kivisydän increases Oulu's accessibility and safety

We are building the Kivisydän parking facility below the city centre of Oulu, in northern Finland, making the services of the centre easily accessible both on foot and by car. At the same time, the facility will free up space in the cityscape for other uses.

Case

We develop learning environments

We design, build and maintain schools with the PPP model in Finland in Kuopio and Oulu and soon in Pudasjärvi, too. In projects like this, a far-reaching vision is needed: what kind of environment supports new information-gathering methods, virtual learning and cooperation?

Case

We are improving traffic connections in Espoo

In Espoo, in the Helsinki metropolitan area, we are building the Turveradantie street, a main link connecting the districts of Leppävaara, Mankkaa and Tapiola and passing over the Turunväylä highway. Turveradantie street will be connected with Turunväylä highway via a graded interchange that is part of the same contract.

Case

Renovating the Parliament Building to meet today’s requirements

We started the renovation of the main Parliament Building in Helsinki in spring 2015. Work will continue until autumn 2017. For the duration of the renovation, the Parliament will be relocated to the Sibelius Academy building, where we altered the concert hall to serve as a Session Hall during the winter 2014–2015.

Case

New fall protection equipment makes it easier to work safely

In occupational safety, we are continuously working towards the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT’s target of zero accidents and we are paying particular attention to the use of protective equipment. At the Kahvikortteli construction site in Helsinki, we have developed new fall protection equipment.

Case

Mass stabilisation by the sea

A shipping lane in front of Jätkäsaari, Helsinki’s new seaside residential area, was moved in 2012–2014. As ship traffic to the West Terminal in Jätkäsaari has increased significantly during the past few years, traffic safety and adherence to timetables required a new lane routing.

Case

Use of reclaimed asphalt on the rise in Denmark

In Denmark, we increased the use of reclaimed asphalt to 26% from our total asphalt production in 2014.

Case

Learning common rules through an online training programme

We comply with Lemminkäinen’s Code of Conduct in everything we do. It ensures that we obey the law and norms in each of our operating countries. The Code of Conduct applies to each and every one of us.

Case

Laboratory specialised in paving

Our Central Laboratory in Tuusula, Finland, serves Lemminkäinen’s business operations and customers in our different operating countries. The Laboratory’s area of expertise is infrastructure construction, in particular paving.

Case

The metro goes west

The West Metro contract, which began five years ago in the Helsinki metropolitan area, in Finland, proceeded in giant leaps during 2014. We continued work on the Tapiola and Matinkylä metro station contracts that we started in 2013 and will be completed by the end of 2015. According to forecasts, the Tapiola and Matinkylä stations will have the highest number of passengers of all stations in Espoo, with 20,000–30,000 passengers travelling through them every day.

In May 2014, we started our third station contract, the construction of the Niittykumpu station. For a long time, Niittykumpu featured in the plans only as a reservation for a station, but in October 2013, the Espoo City Council made the decision to have the station built on the same schedule as the other stations. During the summer and early autumn, we worked hard at the Niittykumpu construction site, doing day, evening and weekend shifts. The Niittykumpu station contract covers the construction of the station building and the maintenance tunnel. Our customer ordered the work as a management contract, which means that the cash basis policy is, unlike the two earlier station contracts, a target price contract and is based on open cost control with the customer. The Niittykumpu station will be completed by the end of 2015.

In 2014, our West Metro project proceeded above ground when all excavation work was completed in February. During the past five years, Lemminkäinen and other construction companies excavated two parallel 13.9-kilometre track tunnels and eight stations. In September, the superstructure contract, in other words, the actual track work, was launched throughout the West Metro line.

In September 2014, the Espoo City Council gave the green light for the extension of the West Metro from Matinkylä to Kivenlahti. Construction work between Matinkylä and Kivenlahti includes seven kilometres of new metro track as well as five metro stations: Finnoo, Kaitaa, Soukka, Espoonlahti and Kivenlahti.

Case

Aino residential complex – record-breaking construction time

The Aino residential complex is located in the centre of St Petersburg, in Russia, in the historical district on Vasiliyevsky Island. A thirteen-storey building comprises six interconnected sections. The Aino residential complex was built in two phases and completed in 2013 and 2014. An underground heated parking facility is designed for 156 parking spaces. The ground floor of the Aino residential complex accommodates commercial premises.

Unique technical solutions

The unique technologies of the environmentally friendly and energy-efficient construction have been implemented in the Aino residential complex and are incorporated in the building structure, its engineering systems and apartment layouts. All apartments were fitted with a smart-house system, which allows automatic optimisation and control of the heating system of the apartment. The building has also its own gas boiler plant equipped with weather-dependent automation that controls the heat supply depending on the outdoor temperature. We always use environmentally friendly finishing materials from the leading European manufacturers.

Ahead-of-schedule commissioning

The construction of the second stage of the Aino residential complex started at the end of 2013. Thanks to the structural solutions and the well-coordinated three-shift operations, we reduced the installation time of one floor in three sections to 7 days, with one of those days used for setting of concrete. That allowed us to construct the building faster than planned. The first residents have already moved into their new homes.

A historical kindergarten

In September 2014, we handed over to the City of St Petersburg a kindergarten located in the Aino residential complex. The kindergarten in Aino is the first social facility that was constructed by the contractor at their expense and handed over to the City as a part of the city infrastructure. The kindergarten is designed for 60 children and houses the spaces for three age groups, a hall for musical and sports activities, a kitchen, a medical office and staff offices. The kindergarten opened in January 2015.

Case

Rantaväylä tunnel will remove a bottleneck

In 2014, cars are still queueing at traffic lights on Rantaväylä road in Tampere, in central Finland, during the evening rush hour, but the situation soon will become better. The construction of the Rantaväylä tunnel will improve the flow and safety of traffic and contribute to the development of Tampere city centre. It will free up plots by lake Näsijärvi, enabling the construction of the Ranta-Tampella residential area for approximately 3,600 residents.

We will move the Rantaväylä section between Santalahti and Naistenlahti into a 2.3-kilometre road tunnel, the longest in Finland, that will also go under the Tammerkoski rapids. In addition to the tunnel, we will construct two graded interchanges and related road arrangements in the area. The project improves a 4.2-kilometre section of Highway 12.

“In 2014, approximately one third of the contract was completed and about 70% of the tunnel was ready. Outside the tunnel, we carried out ground cutting, foundation reinforcement, open-pit excavation and treatment of contaminated soil, among other work. Two bridges are ready. At the turn of the year, the construction site had a total of approximately 360 workers,” says Esko Mulari, Project Manager for the alliance contract at Lemminkäinen.

In an alliance, cooperation is power

The Rantaväylä tunnel project is being carried out through an alliance formed by Lemminkäinen, the City of Tampere, the Finnish Transport Agency, the engineering office Saanio & Riekkola Oy, and A-Insinöörit Suunnittelu Oy. The alliance is a pioneering implementation model in Finland. The customer and the service providers design and implement the project together, as a joint organisation. Everyone wins when benefits and risks are shared.

Through jointly created innovations, we are reducing the disruption caused by the construction site, creating cost savings and accelerating the progress of the project. One of the innovations of the alliance was to change the planned location of the access tunnel. “We built an access tunnel in the middle of the site using the existing access tunnel of the Näsinkallio sports facility. Starting from the middle, we are excavating two road tunnels east and two road tunnels west. Without this innovation, we would have needed to start excavation in the middle of the existing Rantaväylä road and to build a detour for current traffic close to the shore of lake Näsijärvi,” Esko Mulari says.

The Rantaväylä tunnel project is divided into two separate phases. The project’s development phase took place in 2012–2013 and the implementation began in October 2013. The tunnel will be opened to traffic in 2017.

Case

Meeting high-quality requirements in airport paving in western Norway

Our completion of the paving of one of the two runways at Stavanger Airport Sola in June 2014, in northern Norway, is the latest in a string of recent airport projects for us in Finland and Norway. The work was completed in just nine days and met the high-quality requirements. ”It was an intensive project. Including sub-contractors, there were 75 people working in shifts around the clock,” says Åsbjørn Skrettingland, head of Lemminkäinen Norway’s Region West.

Airport projects are complex, with high requirements for density, stability and wear resistance. ”We had to create an asphalt recipe that met all these requirements and a surface durability of at least 12 years, to secure a runway surface with the highest standards,” says Skrettingland. The busy airport was open for traffic throughout construction and paving operations, and we worked in close cooperation with our customer Avinor. Avinor is a wholly-owned state limited company under the Norwegian Ministry of Transport and Communications and is responsible for 46 state-owned airports.

Safety is always priority number one in our operations, but in airport projects security demands are of a different order entirely. ”We need to be focused on extreme 'clean' operations throughout, for instance by removing small stones in order to prevent any damage to aircraft engines or fuselages. In addition, we had contingency plans for equipment removal in case of a stoppage, to make sure the runway was kept open at all times,” says Skrettingland.

Although the final assessment report on the work delivered has not been yet received, we have received very positive feedback from the customer Avinor. “We are pleased with both the planning and execution at our end, and Avinor has signalled satisfaction with the full project delivery,” says Skrettingland. "We have contributed to safe and smooth take-offs and landings."

Case

One sea – many scenes

We are building new homes and commercial premises in various parts of Helsinki, Finland. The projects offer solutions for many different needs, and their location varies from peaceful natural surroundings to active urban areas. Most of these projects have one thing in common: the sea. Seaside area planning and solutions related to construction activities in city centres are part of our core expertise. The day-to-day life of residents is the focus of contemporary residential planning: services, transportation connections, recreational services and jobs are all located in the vicinity of residential areas. When building new residential areas, we can implement innovative solutions with regard to waste recycling, parking and the comfort and safety of yards.

The new seaside residential area of Jätkäsaari

Jätkäsaari has become a new seaside neighbourhood in central Helsinki, and will be home to 17,000 residents by 2025. Saukonpaasi, our residential development and construction project in the area, consists of high-quality apartment blocks and low-rise apartment buildings. In 2013, we started the construction of housing cooperative Merituuli, the first of our four apartment complexes. In 2014, we continued construction in the Ruori, Kompassi and Loisto apartment complexes. The seven-storey apartment blocks will have 50 residential units each. All apartments have glazed balconies with a view of the sea. The apartment blocks have a cooling system that allows residents to reduce the indoor temperature by a few degrees in the summer. In Jätkäsaari, waste is collected by an innovative pipeline-based system that reduces maintenance vehicle traffic in the neighbourhood.

Long-term solutions in the Töölö Bay area

In 2011–2014, we built new commercial premises in a premium location, Töölö Bay, in Helsinki. Alma Media’s head office, completed in 2012 next to the railway tracks, has now been joined by EY’s and KPMG’s office buildings, completed in 2014. KPMG’s office building is a colourful eye-catcher that has a 200-metre-long wavy facade. All of the new business premises represent timeless, high-quality architecture.

Töölö Bay is also a residential area. Housing cooperative Aalto was completed in 2013, followed by the 15-apartment Alvar in May 2014 and Arietta in June 2014. The apartments meet the highest standards and are designed to be comfortable in all four seasons. All of the buildings in the Töölö Bay area meet the criteria for international LEED environmental certification.

An entity consisting of four residential blocks in Vuosaari

In the Vuosaari region in Helsinki, we are building an attractive residential entity of 22 apartment blocks, housing approximately 2,000 people, on the plot of land where Paulig’s old coffee roastery was once located. Construction on the Kahvikortteli residential blocks began in 2011, and the buildings will be completed over several stages by 2022.

The buildings will form residential blocks with protected and safe inner courtyards. Parking spaces for the apartments will be built under a deck in the yard, with direct lift access from the parking facility to the residential floors. Kahvikortteli is located close to a boat harbour and a beach. The area offers excellent opportunities for outdoor activities and hobbies, as well as convenient access to the Helsinki city centre by metro.

In 2014, housing cooperative Paahtaja was completed and the construction of Kahvipannu started. The construction of the 13-storey Kahvimylly also proceeded on schedule.

Case

Kivisydän increases Oulu's accessibility and safety

We are building the Kivisydän parking facility below the city centre of Oulu, in northern Finland, making the services of the centre easily accessible both on foot and by car. At the same time, the facility will free up space in the cityscape for other uses.

Kivisydän will expand Oulu’s commercial centre and improve the parking situation in the heart of the city. Underground parking makes it possible to carry out complementary construction in central blocks, develop parks and expand the Rotuaari pedestrian zone. By moving parking and maintenance traffic underground, the functionality, attractiveness and safety of the expanding central pedestrian zone can be improved significantly.

With good planning, we have ensured that traffic and daily life in nearby properties can proceed as normally as possible during the project.

Kivisydän, to be excavated at a depth of around 30 metres below the centre of Oulu, will be a high-quality 900-space parking facility utilising modern technology. Its functionality, safety and comfort will be among the elite of parking facilities. Below the facility, we will build a maintenance road along which will be the maintenance premises of four properties.

We started the construction of the parking facility in the summer and work on technical building systems began in late autumn. Excavation and reinforcement work will be completed at the beginning of 2015. Construction is proceeding on schedule and the project will be completed in autumn 2015.

Case

We develop learning environments

We design, build and maintain schools with the PPP model in Finland in Kuopio, Oulu and Pudasjärvi. In projects like this, a far-reaching vision is needed: what kind of environment supports new information-gathering methods, virtual learning and cooperation? Ensuring the best conditions for learning, teaching and multiprofessional school communities is our top priority, starting from the planning stage.

With the PPP model, construction expands into a comprehensive long-term service. We design and construct the buildings meticulously and maintain the premises throughout the 25-year lifecycle responsibility. In addition to the owner’s needs, the PPP builder must understand the users' needs. For this reason, we cooperate closely with users and planners and utilise pedagogic expertise when designing learning environments.

“We consider how everything works, how information will be shared at schools in the future, and how project schedules and costs are managed. By taking user needs into account at all phases, we are also building the trust required by a long-term partnership,” describes Vice President Esa Kemppainen, who is responsible for PPP projects at Lemminkäinen.

The Kastelli community centre in Oulu, in northern Finland, was completed in autumn 2014 and is an educational, leisure and cultural centre for the residents of the nearby areas and the entire city. The building houses a day-care centre, a comprehensive school, upper secondary schools for young people and adults, an adult education centre, a library and a youth centre. The building is designed to be a modern collaborative learning environment that is equipped to meet the needs of the future learning and teaching environments in many ways. The space is extensively adaptable and the structural solutions are sustainable and lasting. Kastelli is the first Nordic school to be awarded the Gold level LEED for Schools certificate. The community centre was also awarded the Finnish Association of Civil Engineers’ annual RIL award.

Currently, we are building a timber school in the Poropudas region in Pudasjärvi, in northern Finland. The school will be taken into use in the summer of 2016 and comprises four buildings to house the primary and secondary schools, a high school, an adult education centre and the school gym. The school will accommodate around 800 students. In addition to planning and construction, we are responsible for the maintenance, upkeep, user services and basic renovation investments during the 25-year service contract.

Case

We are improving traffic connections in Espoo

In Espoo, in the Helsinki metropolitan area, in Finland, we are building the Turveradantie street, a main link connecting the districts of Leppävaara, Mankkaa and Tapiola and passing over the Turunväylä highway. Turveradantie street will connect with Turunväylä highway via the Turvesolmu graded interchange that is part of the same contract. The contract covers major earthworks and civil engineering work as well as six new bridges.

The Turvesolmu and Turveradantie project is the all-time largest individual project undertaken and self financed by the City of Espoo; it provides employment for hundreds of people. Nearly all of the work included in the contract lies within Lemminkäinen’s core areas of infrastructure construction expertise. For example, the contract entails excavation, crushing, treatment of contaminated soil, piling, stabilisation and paving. We are also improving noise reduction in the area to minimise noise nuisance in residential areas.

Turveradantie significantly improves not only traffic connections within Espoo, but also connections to the main road network of the Helsinki metropolitan area. It is estimated that in 2030, approximately 9,800 cars per day will use the street between Mankkaantie and Sinimäentie. The currently unbuilt area will be developed; a shopping centre is also being planned close to Turveradantie street.

In 2014, piling and bridge casting were started at the construction site. The construction site was awarded Piling Site of the Year 2014 by the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT. The grounds for the award included the project's extremely challenging foundation conditions. Paving and  construction of stone-paved areas and noise barriers as well as landscaping will begin in spring 2015. The contract will be completed in late 2015.

Case

Renovating the Parliament Building to meet today’s requirements

We started the renovation of the main Parliament Building in Helsinki, Finland, in spring 2015. Work will continue until autumn 2017. For the duration of the renovation, the Parliament will be relocated to the Sibelius Academy building, where we altered the concert hall to serve as a Session Hall during the winter 2014–2015.

The Parliament Building was completed in 1931. Its main building has never been fully renovated before. For instance, the technical building systems are the original ones, the basement is cramped, and the interior and the facades, along with their stairs, require renovation or restoration.

We have strong experience in technically demanding, versatile and extensive renovation projects. We ensure that the entire contract is carried out on schedule and with high quality and cost efficiency.

When the renovation is completed, the Parliament will have fully restored and energy-efficient premises. Accessibility will also be improved, as the southern lift tower will be renovated to accommodate larger lifts and a service lift.

One of the most demanding parts of the contract will be the expansion of the narrow pipe tunnel in the basement area, which requires excavation in an area sensitive to vibration.

“Both the site and the project are unique in Finland in many ways. The Parliament Building is a unique part of our national heritage, and it is subject to continuous publicity. The museal protection results in its own challenges. The seasons and humidity conditions will change during the project, but the indoor conditions must continuously be in such a state that the works of art and specially treated surfaces do not suffer. The schedule of this major project is another challenge; this is why we chose the supplier well in advance in order to ensure a shared clear insight into the details even before the work begins,” says Hannu Peltonen, Project Manager at the Parliament.


 

Case

New fall protection equipment makes it easier to work safely

In occupational safety, we are continuously working towards the Confederation of Finnish Construction Industries RT’s target of zero accidents and we are paying particular attention to the use of protective equipment. At the Kahvikortteli construction site in Helsinki, we have developed new fall protection equipment. It is intended to be used in moulding work in prefabricated apartment blocks where timber moulds are installed around a floor or a section for the casting of elements. When working at a height, proceeding floor by floor, the use of functional and safe protective equipment at each phase of the work is crucial.

The father of the innovation, Lemminkäinen's Site Manager Sami Saarinen, says that with the aid of the new safety pole, the safe working area of a single employee extends up to 20 metres, whereas with traditional fall protection equipment, it is approximately three metres. This makes working easier and speeds up production substantially.

Together with Vepe Oy, a company specialising in occupational safety solutions for the construction industry, we utilised the idea in order to develop a bushing, which is installed into wall elements at the factory and in which the pole is inserted at the construction site. The use of the fall protection equipment requires two poles that are placed on opposite sides of the floor. The poles are connected with a Lifeline safety line, to which the employees’ harnesses are attached.

The working area increases

With the new fall protection equipment, employees can move easily.

“There can be two employees attached to Lifeline safely, expanding their working area to a total of 400 square metres. In this way, moulding can be carried out on both sides of the section at the same time,” says Sami Saarinen.

The new protective equipment will be used on Lemminkäinen’s other residential construction sites, whenever possible.


 

Case

Mass stabilisation by the sea

A shipping lane in front of Jätkäsaari, Helsinki’s new seaside residential area, was moved in 2012–2014. As ship traffic to the West Terminal in Jätkäsaari has increased significantly during the past few years, traffic safety and adherence to timetables required a new lane routing.

The seabed was dredged for the new lane, and we stabilised dredged soil masses for further use. As the dredged masses were mildly contaminated and contained heavy metals and other hazardous substances, they could not be disposed of in the sea but had to be placed on land.

We transferred the nearly 40,000 m³ of dredged masses to basins that had been built specifically for them on the shores of Jätkäsaari island. We stabilised the masses with various binders. The binders used included, for example, Helsingin Energia’s by-products, such as fly ash produced by the combustion of coal and desulphurisation end product produced in flue-gas scrubbing. On the customer’s request, we also tested oil shale ash from Estonia as a binder. According to the results, it works as a binder as well as coal fly ash.

Together with the Public Works Department and our customer, Stara (the construction service of the City of Helsinki), we achieved an end result that everyone was satisfied with. The City of Helsinki can use the solidified dredged masses as a filler in noise barriers or at landfill sites, for example. Consequently, less waste is produced and there is also less need to use virgin materials.

Case

Use of reclaimed asphalt on the rise in Denmark

In Denmark, we increased the use of reclaimed asphalt to 26% from our total asphalt production in 2014.

The use of old crushed asphalt pavements as part of new asphalt has increased significantly. Nowadays, approximately 20% of all new asphalt in Denmark is produced using recycled asphalt.

One of our worksites where we used a large amount of reclaimed asphalt in the base layer in 2014, was the new motorway constructed around the city of Silkeborg for the Danish Road Directorate. Lemminkäinen started the paving work there in 2013 and it was finished during autumn 2014. The total asphalt volume of the contract was about 240,000 tonnes.

Durable reclaimed asphalt

Ordinary asphalt is made from 95% mineral aggregates and 5% bitumen, which is the binder in asphalt. Recycling old asphalt saves valuable natural resources, expensive bitumen as well as large quantities of crushed rock. It also decreases asphalt production's carbon dioxide emissions.

In principle, all types of old asphalt can be recycled into new durable and high-quality asphalt.

Case

Learning common rules through an online training programme

We comply with Lemminkäinen’s Code of Conduct in everything we do. It ensures that we obey the law and norms in each of our operating countries. The Code of Conduct applies to each and every one of us. With it and other common guidelines, we can ensure that everything we do supports the achievement of Lemminkäinen’s targets of improving our competitiveness, profitability and financial position. The Code of Conduct also applies to our partners.

Our employee surveys have indicated that some Lemminkäinen employees are not sure about how to implement the Code of Conduct in practice. Consequently, we launched Code of Conduct online training for the entire personnel in autumn 2014. The aim of the training is to teach us to apply the Code of Conduct in our day-to-day work and to act according to our common rules, also in conflict situations.

Not all of Lemminkäinen employees work on computers, so the online training was arranged in two ways. White-collars took the training independently; for blue-collars, group events were organised at construction sites in connection with weekly meetings, for instance.

Our goal was for all Lemminkäinen employees to complete the training by the end of 2014. The exception to this is certain seasonal employees, who will take the training when they return to work in 2015.

We have received positive feedback on the training. An online environment is an easy way to familiarise oneself with different topics, and learning common rules also strengthened the sense of togetherness within the Group. In the future, the training will be repeated annually, and online training will be used when implementing other common rules and guidelines, too.

Case

Laboratory specialised in paving

Our Central Laboratory in Tuusula, Finland, serves Lemminkäinen’s business operations and customers in our different operating countries. The Laboratory’s area of expertise is infrastructure construction, in particular paving.

Our paving customers, such as the Swedish Transport Administration, require high quality and absolute reliability in testing activities. For this reason, the Central Laboratory and the Oulu regional laboratory operating under it have applied for and been granted accreditation for certain asphalt tests. Accreditation, laboratory certification (SFS-EN ISO 9001:2000) and external audits required by the CE marking of products guarantee the validity of results.

“Accreditation means that supervision exceeds the requirements of CE marking. It is a guarantee given by an official authority indicating that our operations are reliable and independent, and our reports are valid,” says Nina Orttenvuori, Product Development Manager at Lemminkäinen.

New uses for asphalt products

In addition to quality control, the Central Laboratory develops and improves asphalt products and finds new uses for them. The products include recycled asphalt and polymer-modified bitumen, or, in colloquial terms, rubber bitumen. For the latter, we are the only Finnish producer that manufactures it for use on roads.

“Our extensive experience of polymer modification in particularly demanding paving is now utilised in the binding agents for paving aggregates used on other traffic routes and at airports. In this way, we have succeeded in extending the useful life of paving and making it more weatherproof,” Orttenvuori explains.

“Recycling of old asphalt has increased significantly during the past few years. Recycled asphalt has become an important raw material for asphalt. Consequently, the properties of old asphalt must be studied and known thoroughly when planning new mixtures. Laboratory tests play a significant role in this. Our production operations are highly controlled and the products are tested regularly. Customers have no quality risks to worry about,” says Vesa Laitinen, Research Manager at Lemminkäinen.

Lemminkäinen has a paving laboratory in each of its operating countries. In addition to the Finnish laboratories, the Latvian, Lithuanian, Estonian and Swedish laboratories are accredited.