Case gallery

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Runway experts

During the past few years, we have repaired many runways at Nordic airports. At the main airport in Finland, Helsinki Airport, we have repaired runway 3 and taxiways. In 2015, we also paved aprons and main runway 1.

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Rotermann underground parking facility

The Rotermann Quarter in the heart of Tallinn, Estonia, is a former industrial area that has been given a new life as a modern shopping, entertainment, business and residential zone.

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From wasteland to a living city district

In Finland, a new neighbourhood is emerging in Pasila, Helsinki, which requires diverse infrastructure construction projects in a small area. Central Pasila still resembles a wasteland, but the neighbourhood is changing and evolving.

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From an office property to a hotel

In January 2015, we began the renovation of the Auratalo office property located in Helsinki’s Meilahti district and its conversion into a hotel and renovated business premises.

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Strict requirements for tunnel work

Every morning and afternoon, commuter traffic backs up at the end of Lyngbyvej, the road that leads to Denmark’s capital Copenhagen from the northern part of Sjælland island.

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Capacity of Helsinki Airport to increase

We act as the project management contractor in the Helsinki Airport terminal expansion in Finland which aims to develop the capacity of the airport.

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A new wastewater treatment plant is being built underground

In Finland the Helsinki Region Environmental Services (HSY) is building a new wastewater treatment plant in Espoo’s Blominmäki bedrock to replace the current Suomenoja plant, the capacity of which would not be sufficient for the entire region’s wastewater in the future.

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Making traffic safe for all

The Kanebogen intersection south of the city of Harstad in Norway is perhaps the most heavily trafficked crossroads in Norwegian Sør Troms county, with some 15,000 cars passing through it every day.

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Environment at centre stage of the Rantaväylä tunnel

Major infrastructure projects affect the environment and people living in the nearby areas in many ways. A variety of environmental aspects has been taken into account in the construction of the Rantaväylä tunnel in Tampere, Finland.

Case

Runway experts

During the past few years, we have repaired many runways at Nordic airports. At the main airport in Finland, Helsinki Airport, we have repaired runway 3 and taxiways. In 2015, we also paved aprons and main runway 1.

When selecting the contractor, the customer's top three priorities were: flight safety, quality and rapid completion. “The quality of the work must be so high that nothing has to be redone. The schedule is tight, with absolutely no leeway. The contractor must have capacity, proven professional skills and flexibility,” says Ari Sireeni, Project Manager at Finavia.

Top speed, prime quality

In Denmark, we repaired a runway overnight in the summer of 2015. The work had to be completed rapidly, as Sønderborg Airport only has this one runway. Our team of 70 people worked nonstop for 30 hours on the runway, which was 1.8-kilometres-long and 30-metres-wide. Despite the tight schedule, the asphalt and the work had to be of prime quality.

Arctic conditions pose their own challenges in airport paving operations: for example, the airport in Svalbard, Norway, is located on an island far in the Arctic Ocean. With no local asphalt production, we shipped an asphalt plant and other necessary materials to the site. We had to carefully plan a suitable asphalt mix for the location, as the temperature at the airport ranges between -44 °C and +22 °C.

In addition to these examples, we have paved many other runways in Finland as well as at the Andøya and Tromsø airports in Norway.

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Rotermann underground parking facility

The Rotermann Quarter in the heart of Tallinn, Estonia, is a former industrial area that has been given a new life as a modern shopping, entertainment, business and residential zone.

We built a two-level underground parking facility underneath the valuable heritage site where the soil was weak and historic structures overhead fragile. The parking facility was built at the same time as three new shop, office and apartment structures were being built directly overhead, one of them within the old facade of a salvaged building.

The area, located about 500 meters from Tallinn Bay, is old seabed with soft, weak soil layers and an unusually high groundwater table of 1.5 to 2 metres below the ground.

New solutions in Estonia

The parking facility’s base slab is nearly seven metres below groundwater level, so the enormous water pressure had to be taken into consideration. As part of the solution, we installed sheet piles around the excavation as the site’s permanent structure — the first for a similarly-designed underground parking facility project in Estonia. Pumps and drainage systems also played a role.

It was also essential to keep vibrations to a minimum to prevent damage to the historical buildings above and nearby. We used a special low-vibration press to install the sheet piles and placed vibrographs in nearby buildings to monitor the situation.

An old 53-metre brick chimney standing directly on top of the future parking facility area also required special measures. A combination of load-bearing support piles forming a retaining wall and tension strands was used to take the loads and keep the chimney stable.

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From wasteland to a living city district

In Finland, a new city district is emerging in Pasila, Helsinki, which requires diverse infrastructure construction projects in a small area. Central Pasila still resembles wasteland but the city is changing and evolving.

In the future, Pasila will be home to 20,000 residents and a workplace to 50,000 employees. The area will also feature a new shopping centre. The changes being made require unimpeded and safe access routes as well as water, electricity, heat and data networks.

Our two-part contract in Pasila is urban construction in its truest sense. We will extend the Teollisuuskatu street under the railway to Central Pasila. We will turn an old railway tunnel into a tunnel for cars and build a new tunnel as its continuation. In addition, we will build two new bridges as well as high-quality paving and green structures on Teollisuuskatu.

On Pasilankatu, we have built new tram rails and renewed public utilities, in addition to paving and road work. At the same time, preparations have been made for future infrastructure. “For the city's residents, the project is visible first and foremost through the clearer traffic arrangements,” says Sauli Kivivuori, project manager at the Public Works Department of the City of Helsinki.

Strict criteria for the partner

The criteria in the tendering organised by the ordering customer, the Public Works Department, included price, sufficient quality management systems and plans, a report on weeding out the grey economy and RALA certificate of competence. The RALA qualifications are issued by an independent assessment board representing the construction industry and enable companies to prove their expertise, responsibility and reliability to their customers and stakeholders.

“We wanted the partner to be a company that can handle a demanding contract in an area with busy traffic; the company must have the capacity to handle surprises and additional work that may come up as the project proceeds,” Sauli Kivivuori summarises.

The contract is due for completion in the spring of 2017.

Case

From an office property to a hotel

In January 2015, we began the renovation of the Auratalo office property located in Helsinki’s Meilahti district and its conversion into a hotel and renovated business premises. When the project is completed in spring 2016, Restel, the main user of the premises, will open a new, modern city hotel in the building.

Auratalo was built as business premises for the Aura insurance company in the early 1960s. Nowadays, the property is owned by LocalTapiola. In recent years, it has served as office and business premises for several operators. In addition to complete renovation, the property will require a space reconfiguration.

Modernisation for today’s needs

We are modernising the 14-storey Auratalo to meet today’s requirements and convert the office premises for its new purpose. The building’s 12-storey tower block will house 188 hotel rooms, the ground floor will have two restaurants, and a grocery shop will be located in the upper basement level. We will completely renew the interior and technical building systems and restore the facade to its original 1960's appearance utilising modern solutions.

We are carrying out the project as a management contract. The contract also includes design management.

Auratalo’s renovation will increase the value of the property. Once the project is completed, the tenants and end users will have modern, efficient and comfortable premises. The cityscape board considered Auratalo’s facade as a valuable gem of its own period and soon the restored facade will again be an important element in Helsinki’s urban idyll.

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Strict requirements for tunnel work

Every morning and afternoon, commuter traffic gets jammed at the end of Lyngbyvej, the road which leads into Denmark’s capital Copenhagen from the northern part of the island Sjælland. As a solution to these traffic jams, the City of Copenhagen is building a completely new road, Nordhavnsvej, which will include a 620-metre tunnel, for cars and heavy traffic. The tunnel will go under a road and four railway tracks.

We are paving the Nordhavnsvej road and the tunnel. The paving requirements are strict. Particularly in the long, four-lane tunnel, the various phases require special meticulousness. For example, the thickness and curve of the paving layers must be absolutely right and the paving has to be completely even.

Durable paving for a busy road

When Nordhavnsvej is opened, it will be a busy road with a lot of heavy traffic. When choosing the paving material and carrying out the different phases, we have taken the site’s special characteristics into account in order to ensure the driving comfort and safety of the road as well as the longest possible durability and functionality of the asphalt. 

The combined road and tunnel should open to traffic by the end of 2017. After this, traffic will become easier and faster both for commuters and residents of the area.

Part of Denmark’s traffic network improvement

Nordhavnsvej is part of a more comprehensive traffic network improvement in Denmark. As a next step in this process, the City of Copenhagen will build the Nordhavn tunnel, which will connect Nordhavnsvej with Copenhagen Harbour. In addition, the City of Copenhagen and the Danish State are negotiating on the Havnetunnel, which, when completed, would enable passage under the harbour and would connect the Nordhavn tunnel with the motorways south of the city in the area near the airport and the bridge leading to Sweden.

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Capacity of Helsinki Airport to increase

We are the project management contractor in the Helsinki Airport terminal expansion in Finland. After the expansion, the airport will be able to accommodate a higher number of new wide-body aircraft, for example. The expansion also includes a new security control. In addition, we will expand luggage handling facilities and build a separate bus terminal to serve the increasing number of aprons stands.

Construction started in the autumn 2015 and will be completed in 2020. During the autumn 2015, we planned the different phases of the project in cooperation with the customer and planners. In September, we started the construction of the bus terminal after only a month of preparations.

In use throughout the construction

The airport is an extremely demanding as a working environment, due to tight restrictions and special safety regulations, for instance. The terminal building will be in use throughout the expansion, and our aim is to carry out the work so that the impact on the airport’s smooth flow of passenger traffic is as minimal as possible.

The project is led using the Big Room method, with us in charge of it. In the Big Room, the various parties of the project work in the same space. One of these parties is Destia which is the alliance contractor for the airport groundwork of the expansion. Lemminkäinen and Destia share common project targets.

“Helsinki Airport is one of the leading airports in Europe when measured in the number of airline passengers heading towards Asia. By expanding the terminal, we will be able to offer them higher quality service and receive larger wide-body aircraft at Helsinki Airport,” says Kari Savolainen, CEO of Finavia.

 

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A new wastewater treatment plant is being built underground

Helsinki Region Environmental Services in Finland is building a new wastewater treatment plant in Espoo’s Blominmäki bedrock to replace the current Suomenoja plant, which doesn't have enough capacity to handle the entire region’s wastewater in the future.

The caves excavated underground will house wastewater treatment basins and the majority of other facilities, too. The aboveground parts of the wastewater treatment plant will consist of the administrative and repair shop buildings, the methanol reception station, biogas storage facilities and the exhaust tower.

Our contract includes the excavation works and rock support works of the new wastewater treatment plant.

“We are excavating multiple parallel caves at the same time. We will utilise our experience from our similar earlier projects. Our customer will benefit this through effective project execution,” says Harri Kailasalo, Executive Vice President, Infra projects.

Progress of excavation

We started tunnel excavation in autumn 2015. Excavation and support works will continue until January 2018.

In addition to open excavation, the excavation work for the aboveground facilities includes drilling, sheeting, loading and stone transport. In the tunnels, we are carrying out blasting and aggregate transport. Blasting work and excavation vibration are measured and monitored during the entire blasting phase. We will excavate approximately 910,000 cubic meters of rock through three tunnels.

After its completion in 2020, the treatment plant will process the wastewater of 400,000 residents from Espoo, Kauniainen, Kirkkonummi, Siuntio and western Vantaa. It is estimated that by 2040, a total of 150,000 cubic metres of wastewater will flow through the new treatment plant daily.

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Making traffic safe for all

Some 15,000 cars a day pass through the Kanebogen intersection in the southern part of the city of Harstad in Norway, making it one of the most heavily trafficked crossroads in Sør Troms county. The area is home to shopping malls, car dealers, residences and a school. The intersection is also the sole point of entry into and exit from the city.

The old road was starting to become dangerous, as nothing separated the vehicle lanes from the footpaths alongside them. Today, we are leading a full reconstruction of the intersection, which includes building a new, wider road around two roundabouts and a linked 40-metre-long pedestrian and bicycle underpass. When the project is completed in summer 2016, there will be dedicated lanes for cars and pedestrians, in addition to 70 new streetlights installed around the site.

“This new construction will make the road safer for everyone — drivers, cyclists and those on foot,” says Jørn Leo Johansen, Site Manager at Lemminkäinen.

We will excavate a total of seven kilometres of pipes for water, sewage, electricity and fibre optic data, move them 50 metres south of their current position and bury them six metres underground. This is the most challenging aspect of the project.

Dialogue with the surrounding community

The project affects the surrounding community, so dialogue with the locals is important.

“Together with Lemminkäinen, we went around visiting local schools and talked about the project and discussed its impacts with local residents. We want to keep traffic outside the centre of Harstad, in part to help with our green travel initiatives. There is so much foot traffic around here, especially among schoolkids, and now it will be even safer. We are building for a better future,” explains Arnt-Børge Jensen, Project Manager at the Norwegian Public Roads Administration.

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Environment at centre stage of the Rantaväylä tunnel

Major infrastructure projects affect the environment and people living in the nearby areas in many ways. A variety of environmental aspects has been taken into account in the construction of the Rantaväylä tunnel in Tampere, Finland.

As a part of the project, we closely monitor the water quality in Lake Näsijärvi, the groundwater level, subsidence of buildings and excavation vibration, among other things. Furthermore, we constantly monitor air quality at the tunnel entrances and update the information on the project website.

We used rock excavated during the project as fill on the shores of Näsijärvi in the Ranta-Tampella and Santalahti areas, where the City of Tampere is planning to construct park areas. Before starting, we installed protective screens around the filling areas in order to contain the water cloudiness caused by filling. The waterway monitoring results show that the protective screens functioned well.

In addition, we clean the streets in the construction site area regularly. During excavation, we even washed truck tyres to prevent dirt from being carried from the construction site to the surrounding areas.

Customer feedback works

Based on the feedback from residents, we changed timetables for blasting in order to minimise noise caused by excavation work. Residents also wanted more attractive fencing at the long-term construction site: as a result, street art events were organised with a local youth culture association and the fences served as a canvas for graffiti.